Australia’s first peer reviewed article on ultrasound Shear wave Elastography

Canon Medical is delighted to acknowledge the authors from SKG Radiology, Curtin University, Edith Cowan University and the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Fiona Stanley Hospital for delivering Australia’s first shear wave publication, Concordance of transient elastography and shear wave elastography for measurement of liver stiffness to be included in Sonography, The Journal of the Australasian Sonographers Association.

Chronic liver disease has an estimated worldwide mortality of 1.5 million per year representing a significant burden to healthcare providers1.

The article explores how historically, the gold standard for determining the degree of fibrosis was liver biopsy; which can be painful, expensive, has a risk of haemorrhage and requires assessment by a pathologist. The study then compared “the performance of ultrasound shear wave elastography, on an ultrasound unit with transient elastography in 29 participants with liver diseases1.

Read Concordance of transient elastography and shear wave elastography for measurement of liver stiffness, an original peer reviewed article using Shear wave Elastography on Canon Medical’s Aplio 500 system published in Sonography, The Journal of the Australasian Sonographers Association: Volume 4, Issue 4 from December 2017.

Read the full article…

Abstract
Introduction

Transient elastography is commonly utilised in liver clinics as a non-invasive method of assessing the degree of fibrosis or presence of cirrhosis in the human liver. Many ultrasound vendors are now providing ultrasound shear wave elastography on commercial ultrasound units. There is limited published data evaluating the performance of ultrasound elastography compared to transient elastography.

Methods

This study compared the performance of ultrasound shear wave elastography, on an ultrasound unit with transient elastography in 29 participants with liver diseases of varying aetiologies.

Results

The mean shear wave pressure for transient elastography and ultrasound shear wave elastography was 7.58 kPa (SD 3.26) and 7.29 (SD 2.02), respectively, with 18 cases having a less than 30% deviation of shear wave elastography from transient elastography.

Conclusion

Both methods provide similar measurements of fibrosis and may be useful non-invasive measures of hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis.

Aplio speed and propagation maps showing a 2.5 × 3 cm elastogram with 2 × 10 mm region of interests. The mean speed of T1 is 1.47 m/s (SD 0.11 m/s) and the mean speed of T2 is 1.43 m/s (SD 0.08 m/s).1

Reference
1. O’Hara, S., Hodson, S., Hernaman, C., Wambeek, N., and Olynyk, J. (2017) Concordance of transient elastography and shear wave elastography for measurement of liver stiffness. Sonography, 4: 141–145. doi: 10.1002/sono.12122.


 


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